In the News: New Renderings of FiDi Tower

••• FiDi residents Michael Chioldi and Scott Hill got married at Trinity Church, with a reception at Pier A. —New York Times

••• Rohan Oza, who gets celebrities to invest in relatively healthy beverages, has a “palatial house [in Beverly Hills] but at a luxury apartment in Tribeca and a house in the Hamptons not far from Shinnecock Hills Golf Club.” —New York Times

••• “Former backwaiter David Bobb filed a class action lawsuit on Thursday, alleging that [Jungsik] pooled the tips and then did not properly pay them out to service staff, according to the complaint. He also claims that the restaurant did not properly pay wait staff during private events where a service charge was levied. Bobb […] worked at the Tribeca restaurant for less than five months between 2014 and 2015. […] He is suing for unpaid minimum wage and legal fees.” The claim may or may not have merit, but bear in mind that there’s a good chance the law firm fed this item to the press, to pressure the restaurant to settle in order to avoid more coverage. (Because it’s unlikely Eater dug through court records.) It would certainly be interesting to know how the legal fees compare to the alleged unpaid compensation. —Eater

••• Photos of the construction of 70 Vestry. —Field Condition

••• The Fat Jew, “the 34-year-old Instagram sensation (whose real name is Josh Ostrovsky) and his wife, Katie Sturino of The 12ish Style, are headed for divorce, Page Six has exclusively confirmed.” They live in Tribeca.

••• “Motorists without an E-ZPass will no longer have to stop to fork over cash to pay the toll at the Hugh L. Carey/Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel. They’ll be charged via license-plate readers that will generate a bill sent to the registered vehicle owner.” —New York Post

••• “Architects unveiled renderings on Friday of the slender, glass-encased, 70-story residential tower coming to 125 Greenwich St. at the corner of Thames St., […] including twice as many units than originally expected. The tower is 15 stories lower than permitted by zoning—the architects at the firm of Rafael Vinoly traded height for a zoning variance that would allow for a larger footprint extending to the lot’s edge, creating larger floor plates on each floor.” —Downtown Express

125 Greenwich rendering courtesy Rafael Vinoly