In the News: Chin Wins by 200 Votes

••• “Two-term Councilmember Margaret Chin was nearly humiliatingly defeated in Lower Manhattan’s District 1 by upstart Christopher Marte, a 28-year-old political neophyte. […] In unofficial Board of Election results, as of 10:37 p.m.—slightly more than an hour and a half after the polls had closed—with 98.84 percent of the vote tallied, only a slim margin of 200 votes separated the two—5,220 votes for Chin to 5,020 for Marte. Chin apparently only avoided a devastating upset because of two other candidates, Dashia Imperiale and Aaron Foldenauer, who ultimately wound up as spoilers in this intensely watched race. Together, the pair took more than 10 percent of the vote, with Foldenauer raking in 699 votes to Imperiale’s 445.” —Downtown Express

••• “Police are looking for three men in their late teens who they say approached a 33-year-old man in front of 154 Reade Street, took $150 from his pocket, then punched him in the head and body.” This was on September 5 at 10 p.m., and there are photos of the suspects. —Tribeca Trib

••• The Real Deal has a long article on retail rents in New York City, and to be honest, it got too wonky for me pretty early on. But if you’re obsessed over the topic, and you have a head for business, you might find it illuminating.

••• “After struggling for months to save their church, the parishioners of St. Joseph’s Chapel in Battery Park City publicly announced a new plan—and perhaps final hope—to preserve their parish in the Gateway Plaza apartment complex. Following a noon service—what they feared could be their last—the church members stood outside their tiny Catholic chapel to present the request they have made to the Battery Park City Authority: Take over the the 3,300-square-foot space and repurpose it into an interfaith and community center that is part Battery Park City memorial to 9/11.” —Tribeca Trib

••• YIMBY has the renderings for the revised topper at 50 Hudson. All signs point to the Landmarks Preservation Commission approving it.

11 Comments

  1. I can’t get over how few people vote. It is in these down ticket elections that young politicians get their start. How many people reside in Chin’s district? Only 5,420 voted. That’s appalling.

    • I wonder how many more people would vote, even in primaries, if separate elections were held for positions where the candidates are mostly unknown by voters, like district headers and convention delegates, and where a choice is rarely given, like judges. Having most of the ballot taken up by candidates and for positions that remind voters how much of the political process is out of their hands seems almost designed to dishearten if not discourage voting.

  2. Per NPR just now, there are still affidavits and absentee ballots to be counted in the Chin election, so they’re co sidering it too close to call.

    Support for her was strongest in Chinatown and Battery Park City.

  3. Chin did win Tribeca. Here is a good analysis of the vote totals:

    http://www.ebroadsheet.com/thin-win-chin/

    I’m willing to bet many of the people who have complained about Chin on these very pages are in the large group of people who didn’t bother to vote at all.

  4. Citywide 13% voted. Abysmal.

  5. I voted on Tuesday, and I was the only person there. Frankly, it brought back memories of last year, all the hope and excitement around voting for Hillary and looking forward to a bright future with our first female President. Maybe it’s just me, but I wonder if lingering depression around the disaster of that election put people off voting this time around. It took determination to get me back over there to the Tweed Courthouse, trying to feel hopeful again…and, yes, only to be disappointed once again, as the at best barely competent Chin beat Marte by a handful of votes and perpetuated the same old same old of bad government amid apathy.

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