Recent Comments

  • Yes, it was 1979. — N on In the News: “Tropical Hell”

  • I'm pretty certain 16 Hudson St. Was co-opted prior to 1991...I'm thinking more like 1985 or so. Dan Ackroyd was one of the first owners of a top floor unit. — Makes you go "hmmmm".... on In the News: “Tropical Hell”

  • Very pretty space. — TG on New Kid on the Block: A Summer Day Café

  • I still miss Delphi. — KP on New Kid on the Block: A Summer Day Café

  • Even though I can't afford most (any) of the art in these places, I still love this development of the neighborhood. It's a pleasure to explore the works of all these artists, even just to take it in through windows while walking down the street. I hope the galleries can survive and remain in the neighborhood (and that we don't follow the Jane Jacobs prediction of eventual ossification into "dead" neighborhoods full of redundant bank branches and chain stores, like way the once gallery-ful East Village ). — Marcus on The Tribeca Art District Continues to Gel

  • I sure did, Jim. Hope they have good insurance! — Maryann on New Kid on the Block: A Summer Day Café

  • This is the 2nd time this particular patch of grass has been grown on this street in the same spot and I think that perhaps 60 Hudson Street (aka The Western Union Building) had planted it to beautify the area after the crane accident there? I don't believe that Xeno the light company in the commercial space at 1 Worth Street planted it? Whoever is responsible for putting down the seeds to grow this little patch of Heaven well done indeed! A bit of grass in Tribeca goes along way...wish there was more of it. — Sonia F. Stock on Where in Tribeca…?

  • Hi Erik, this patch of grass is located outside 1 Worth Street on the corner of Hudson Street, with regards, Sonia Stock — Sonia F. Stock on Where in Tribeca…?

  • Does anyone else notice the MAJOR trip and/or fall hazards? Alcohol is not your navigational friend. #TruthBeTold — Jim Smithers on New Kid on the Block: A Summer Day Café

  • Holy Ground appears to have hired the same clueless staff that put Super Linda out of business. After we were rudely told that we entered through the wrong entrance (112 Reade as advertised) at 5:25PM, for a 5:30 reservation, we were told they didn't open until 5:30 and that we "should leave and come back in a few minutes". We didn't go back. Get a clue and try to last longer than the last failure in the same space... — Fidus on Tribeca’s New Restaurants: A Recap

  • Is it really noisy like the other Seamore's? — KP on New Kid on the Block: Seamore’s

  • Lovely! Thanks. — KP on Seen & Heard: Il Mulino Opens Tonight

  • Tonight NYPD patrol car #5089(14) CTB is parked at that hydrant instead — James on Seen & Heard: Eight Shoots in Tribeca This Week

  • OMG so fabulous. The unboxing video is *legendary*. — Will Meyerhofer on Seen & Heard: Il Mulino Opens Tonight

  • Agreed! We walked by around 5pm on Sunday and just wanted to grab a menu but there was no one at the front nor at the To Go window. I really hope they get their act together soon! — Karen on New Kid on the Block: Seamore’s

  • Please leave Staten Island alone Margaret Chin. As it is, remains the only borough that requires a (steep) toll. — Vima on In the News: Café Forgot Pop-Up

  • The return of the Harmony Theatre? — James on Seen & Heard: Burlesque at Baked?

  • Alliance Française is an amazing resource for all francophones. — Ami on Seen & Heard: New Children’s Theater

  • No relation. — Erik Torkells on Tribeca’s New Restaurants: A Recap

  • Oh boy, these two obviously don't follow current events or the Sarcasm Digest Daily. Sad! #MAGA — Jim Smithers on Seen & Heard: The 1st Precinct Steps Up

  • Is Nonna Betta related to the one in Roman ghetto? If so, very different menu. I was hoping for carciofi alla giudia, per esempio. — Hudson River on Tribeca’s New Restaurants: A Recap

  • See also New York Consolidated Laws, Penal Law - PEN § 165.70 Definitions https://codes.findlaw.com/ny/penal-law/pen-sect-165-70.html See also: New York Consolidated Laws, Penal Law - PEN § 165.71 Trademark counterfeiting in the third degree A person is guilty of trademark counterfeiting in the third degree when, with the intent to deceive or defraud some other person or with the intent to evade a lawful restriction on the sale, resale, offering for sale, or distribution of goods, he or she manufactures, distributes, sells, or offers for sale goods which bear a counterfeit trademark, or possesses a trademark knowing it to be counterfeit for the purpose of affixing it to any goods. Trademark counterfeiting in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. ------------------------------------------------------------------- New York Consolidated Laws, Penal Law - PEN § 165.72 Trademark counterfeiting in the second degree A person is guilty of trademark counterfeiting in the second degree when, with the intent to deceive or defraud some other person or with the intent to evade a lawful restriction on the sale, resale, offering for sale, or distribution of goods, he or she manufactures, distributes, sells, or offers for sale goods which bear a counterfeit trademark, or possesses a trademark knowing it to be counterfeit for the purpose of affixing it to any goods, and the retail value of all such goods bearing counterfeit trademarks exceeds one thousand dollars. Trademark counterfeiting in the second degree is a class E felony. ------------------------------------------------------------------- New York Consolidated Laws, Penal Law - PEN § 165.73 Trademark counterfeiting in the first degree A person is guilty of trademark counterfeiting in the first degree when, with the intent to deceive or defraud some other person, or with the intent to evade a lawful restriction on the sale, resale, offering for sale, or distribution of goods, he or she manufactures, distributes, sells, or offers for sale goods which bear a counterfeit trademark, or possesses a trademark knowing it to be counterfeit for the purpose of affixing it to any goods, and the retail value of all such goods bearing counterfeit trademarks exceeds one hundred thousand dollars. Trademark counterfeiting in the first degree is a class C felony. ------------------------------------------------------------------- New York Consolidated Laws, Penal Law - PEN § 165.74 Seizure and distribution or destruction of goods bearing counterfeit trademarks Any goods manufactured, sold, offered for sale, distributed or produced in violation of this article may be seized by any police officer.  The magistrate must, within forty-eight hours after arraignment of the defendant, determine whether probable cause exists to believe that the goods had been manufactured, sold, offered for sale, distributed or produced in violation of this article, and upon a finding that probable cause exists to believe that the goods had been manufactured, sold, offered for sale, distributed, or produced in violation of this article, the court shall authorize such articles to be retained as evidence pending the trial of the defendant.  Upon conviction of the defendant, the articles in respect whereof the defendant stands convicted shall be destroyed or donated.  Destruction shall not include auction, sale or distribution of the items in their original form.  Donation of the items shall be made at the court's discretion upon the request of any law enforcement agency and pursuant to the restrictions and procedures of section three hundred sixty-m of the general business law , for the benefit of indigent individuals. — James on Seen & Heard: The 1st Precinct Steps Up

  • Erik, thank you, I happened upon your post after writing this and felt duly foolish. Thank you for the info. Is there are web site that tracks all the shoots in the city, and decodes their secret names? — Marcus on Seen & Heard: Eight Shoots in Tribeca This Week

  • Counterfeiting is against the law. US Code Title 18 part 1 Chapter 113 §2320. Trafficking in counterfeit goods or services https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2011-title18/pdf/USCODE-2011-title18-partI-chap113-sec2320.pdf — Marcus on Seen & Heard: The 1st Precinct Steps Up

  • I'd like to clarify what Chris was trying to say: These people are NOT actually breaking the law – counterfeiting (some people don’t realize it’s NOT a crime) and NOT a parasite to the community … residents and businesses … just so some tourists from Ohio can show their friends their NOT fake bag. NYPD should NOT enforce it so Trump doesn’t NOT get any grand ideas and NOT send ICE there. — Jim Smithers on Seen & Heard: The 1st Precinct Steps Up