Recent Comments

  • The Eater post was a round up of standout FiDi (defined as everything south of Chambers) restaurants, but was instead a lazy update for a post from 2017. NOT included, but should should be are the following: Crown Shy, Temple Court, Sola Lab, Blue Ribbon Federal Grill, Da Claudio, Felice, Osteria della Pace, Pistillo's, Il Brigante, Bellini, 10 Corso Como, The Trading Post and the Tuck Room. — Luis Vazquez (FiDi Fan Page) on In the News: Greenhouse at your house

  • FYI. https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/healthy-taco-and-juice-chain-is-bombarding-manhattan-with-five-new-locations/ar-BBWbBPE — Ruben Robles on Seen & Heard: Local landscape architect + Pier 55

  • What is so broken about our our current payment system that it takes priority over getting our actual trains to function? Just take a look at all of the delays. https://twitter.com/NYCTSubway?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor In the past 24 hours there has been at least one delay on every single line. Zero resources should be going to building out a new payment method until the city can get the trains to run properly. — C on The dodo bird, the token, the MetroCard

  • Unless installed on a solid base of concrete (see stretches of Beach / N Moore / Franklin / Harrison between Hudson and Greenwich which are holding up well) they will warp in the next few years. Unfortunately it looks like packed soil in the photos above... — The Cobbler on Seen & Heard: New cobblestones for Desbrosses

  • I meant to reply to Jane below — James on Seen & Heard: New cobblestones for Desbrosses

  • See my reply above — James on Seen & Heard: New cobblestones for Desbrosses

  • "While it has often been reported that Belgian blocks were imported to New York as ship ballast, we have not found primary evidence to confirm this practice." Above footnote and below text from: 'Toward Accessible Historic Streetscapes; A Study of New York City’s Belgian Block Heritage' Prepared for the Historic Districts Council April 2017 "A Brief History: New York’s Belgian Block Heritage "Over the past century and a half, the stones in New York City’s streets have gone by many names. In this report, we refer to the city’s typical, 19th-century granite paving stones as Belgian blocks. These mostly rectangular, tooled granite stones were used as paving materials in cities across America. With the term Belgian block, we distinguish these stones from an earlier paving material, cobblestones, which are untooled, naturally rounded stones that generally predated the use of tooled granite in city pavements. Cobblestones were typically used up to about 1860. "Despite the name Belgian block, it remains unclear to what extent, and during what era, paving stones imported from Belgium may have provided the raw materials for New York City’s streets. It is known that the city’s early paving stones included a type of six inch-square traprock commonly called “Belgian” block, and said to have first been used in Belgium. This non-granitic, igneous stone block, reportedly sourced from the New Jersey Palisades, was introduced in 1852 and in general use after 1859. None of these paving stones are known to be in use today. "The surviving stone we refer to as Belgian block began to be used in the 1870s. It was most likely sourced from quarries within the United States. By 1877, for example, New York contractors were said to have purchased large quarries in the Northeast for the purpose of providing granite paving blocks to New York City. In 1895, the Commissioner of Public Works reported that all of New York City’s granite paving blocks were obtained from quarries on the New England coast. Stones were notably sourced from Maine, including quarries on the island of Vinalhaven. "The existing Belgian block stones in New York City streets today are presumably of this later type quarried in America. Nonetheless, we retain the term Belgian block due to its generally accepted use in referring to granite paving stones, as well as its evocation of the European character that pervaded the city’s early streetscapes and continues to contribute a distinctive sense of place today." — James on Seen & Heard: New cobblestones for Desbrosses

  • According to this NYT’s article it was ship ballast. You can also see in the picture why the new cobblestones failed - I suspect to save money the contractor used too much mortar and so when the heavy construction trucks drive over them they broke down the mortar and the cobblestones moved. https://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/19/nyregion/19cobblestone.html?mtrref=www.google.com — Ships in the night on Seen & Heard: New cobblestones for Desbrosses

  • I've heard that these cobblestones all around Tribeca served as ballast in 19th-century ships. Is that true, or apocryphal? — Jane on Seen & Heard: New cobblestones for Desbrosses

  • Ditto for the need to redo Greenwich. I heard when we moved in that the cobblestone streets would all get redone as part of the building contractors’ construction agreements (since their trucks destroy the roads). Is there any truth to that? — Vestry Family on Seen & Heard: New cobblestones for Desbrosses

  • I’m just going to repeat this TRIBECA IS ONE BIG CONSTRUCTION SITE. We are in north east tribeca. Every corner is scaffolded the noise is deafening. The trucks busses garbage trucks construction vehicles is never ending. All I think about is greed. It’s been going on for years and the minute one ugly building ( the reveal on the Toll brothers on broadway? ) another goes up. — Tino on In the News: Our own collusion, Tribeca real estate style

  • Thanks! Finally! — Robert Ripps on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • Robert has it: Twenty Exchange at Beaver. I added the 20-foot view. You guys are just too good... — Pam Frederick on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • Good news! Has anyone tried them? — Marcus on Seen & Heard: Philly Pretzel Factory Appears Closed

  • Now that i am outside the building and I see that my guess is not correct! But it is very similar. Hopefully Robert has the right answer and if so well done Robert!, regards, Sonia — Sonia F. Stock on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • Actually its 86 Trinity Place not 61 Trinity Place. On the opposite of this door façade it is just as cool! regards, Sonia Stock — Sonia F. Stock on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • This is located on the American Stock Exchange at I believe 61 Trinity Place opposite Trinity Church? regards, Sonia — Sonia F. Stock on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • Robert beat me to it, well done! Regards, Sonia Stock — Sonia Stock on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • Hi, this is outside the American Stock Exchange facade opposite a trinity Church and yes it’s spectacular! Regards, Sonia Stock — Sonia Stock on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • I believe it is 20 Exchange Place — Robert Ripps on Where in (not) Tribeca?

  • And while we're at it, let's note that it's called "Ericsson Place" between Hudson and Varick. A very confusingly named street! — KP on Seen & Heard: Starting to see the light?

  • Pretzels are BACK !! — Ixia on Seen & Heard: Philly Pretzel Factory Appears Closed

  • The 261 Broadway scaffolding was there during facade work mandated by DOB (local law 11). I'm guessing 270 Broadway has now been targeted by the DOB. — 261 Broadway on Seen & Heard: Starting to see the light?

  • You are kidding! Same with Duane and West Broadway. Ugh! — Pam Frederick on Seen & Heard: Starting to see the light?

  • At West Broadway IIRC — James on Seen & Heard: Starting to see the light?