Seen & Heard: Showroom Sample Sale

••• Back when I wrote about the listing (against the owner’s wishes) of 135 Reade, I said that the construction date of the building wasn’t clear. Turns out there’s a clue up by the roof.

••• An update about Town Stages, which presented Wednesday night at Community Board 1: hear from someone at CB1 that Town Stages has decided to go straight to the State Liquor Authority. Consequently, CB1 is drafting a resolution urging the SLA to reject the application because Town Stages wouldn’t agree to the stipulations.

••• Pen Parentis’s November 14 salon “brings together three authors—Michael Greenberg, Joanne Jacobson, and Diana Geffner-Ventura—who will present readings from their new works followed by a panel discussion [….] Admission is free but RSVP is recommended.

••• From S.: “On Franklin and Broadway today, there was a shoot going on for, I believe, “Bull,” around 1:30 p.m. this afternoon. My wife was initially stopped by production staff from crossing Broadway due to filming. At that point my wife decided to go into Gourmet Garage to shop for items instead of just standing and waiting for the scene to be completed. After my wife finished shopping she tried to exit at the side door on Franklin, where a different production worker physically prevented my wife from opening the door. After questioning the worker why this was necessary, angry words were exchanged. This man told my wife she was an awful person and to go f herself (because she was possibly interrupting a shoot??!!).” And that’s why the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment needs to insist that there be someone (not 311) people can contact with complaints.

••• Up now at the Skyscraper Museum: “Lower Manhattan in the 1990s vividly recaptures this strange and formative time in the history of New York’s historic commercial hub, through a striking combination of architectural drawings and models, archival and contemporary photographs, original posters, maps, sketches, renderings, and other documents of the era. Together they offer a portrait of a time and place that, though recent in historic terms, seems oddly remote—due in large part, of course, to the tragic, world-changing event that brought the period to a sudden, unexpected close: the destruction of the World Trade Center, and loss of nearly three thousand lives, on September 11, 2001.”

••• The Battery Park City Authority is having another of its community meetings on Tuesday (6:30-8:30 p.m.) at 6 River Terrace. Submit a question via info.bpc@bpca.ny.gov.

••• Franklin St. Showroom is holding a sample sale November 15-17 (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.): “Brands include Demylee, Le Mont St. Michel, Mollusk Surf Shop, Odette New York, Ozma of California, Zanzan, and more.” I wouldn’t assume that the shirt below is available. I just liked it.

9 Comments

  1. Re: Filming..My husband works on a film crew. Unless the production has ‘bought’ the street- they don’t have a right to stop people from walking through or going about their normal business. What happened to this woman was absolutely not cool or ‘allowed’ Everyone should remember the person put in charge of ‘holding back’ pedestrian traffic is probably the lowest on the totem pole. In future she should ask to speak with the 2nd AD or to the Location Manager (the LM name and contact number is usually posted on the fliers warning of shooting)

  2. That film shoot situation is absolutely ridiculous. How can we file a complaint against the film license? If this happens to anyone else please take a video so we can find the perp.

    Disgusting to have verbal abuse given to anyone on our streets.

  3. Within the last year, my husband was part of a film crew shooting a period TV series outside a townhouse in Brooklyn.
    A woman two doors down from where they were came out in front of her house and started waving her iPhone around in the air (ruining the 1950’s feel) They were polite and asked her if she minded not doing that (she watched and whenever the male star started a scene she would time her waving to him needing to be filmed) She said she wanted 2k to go stop and go back in her house. They gave it to her. Unless you ‘buy’ the street and everyone is being compensated to get off..you can’t dictate to them. You HAVE to be polite and hope people will be cool.

    • Yes. The film crews need to understand they are guests here, in our living and working neighborhood.

      I’ve also been subjected to rude treatment when I walked through a shoot on Union Square; it wasn’t even obvious that a shoot was going on (no signs etc.). A rude self-important crew-person immediately began yelling at me “You! Yes you! Cross the street! Now!” I said “I’m on my way to work and I’ll cross the street when I’m ready. And then I’ll report your rudeness.”

    • (Although extorting money from the film crews when they are nice about it seems a bit extreme! If they are polite, I will of course be accommodating. I have no problem with the film/TV shoots per se, and support the creativity, but it has to be done civilly and with consideration for the neighborhood)>

  4. I have dealt with many filmings over the past few years. 80% of the crews are amazing. They are polite, accommodating, and do not overstep their usage. They realize they are a guest in the community and are considerate.

    That said, the other 20% can be pretty bad and abusive. I have seen several crews significantly overstep what they are allowed to do, can be rude to the community, and hurt local businesses without a care.

  5. Julie Menin presented to CB1 about film shoots and was very proud of the accomplishment that they have minimal 311 complaints. Downtown, we usually have good experiences but when you do not…file a 311 complaint. That is the only way it is tracked and they know who is the bad apple…if you call the phone number on the poster, you may or may not get action & the film office has no idea.

  6. JulieW is absolutely correct. When these guys say “you can’t walk here, you have to cross the street, most people actually believe they have the power to enforce that.
    When Spike Lee was shooting “Mo Better Blues” right outside my building in the West Village his cronies told me I couldn’t watch (from behind the camera- out of view!). I said “you mean I can’t stand on the sidewalk that I OWN”? (my neighbours and I owned the building). Suddenly their attitude completely changed.
    Suddenly I could stand wherever I wanted to.
    They lie because most people think they have the “power”.

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