The Tribeca Art District Continues to Gel

The past few years have seen a number of major additions to Tribeca’s gallery scene, particularly in the northeast: Postmasters, Alexander and Bonin, Bortolami, Ortuzar Projects, Twenty First Gallery, and R & Company’s huge expansion. (And there are others above street level.) Even more momentum is on the way….

••• L.A. gallery Regen Projects’s first New York outpost will be on Lispenard, although it’s taking a while to get started, as there has been no activity since the announcement last fall.

••• Early next year (if things go according to schedule), Artists Space will move into two floors of 80 White, at the northeast corner of Cortlandt Alley. The state of its Artists Space Books & Talks annex at 55 Walker remains up in the air.

••• Also at 80 White, the Bronx Museum of the Arts is opening a 4,500-square-foot facility on the second floor for its Artists in the Marketplace professional development program. In the fall of 2016, Crain’s reported, “Donated by General Hardware Co.—a longtime donor to the AIM program—the building will offer five free studios for artists, as well as exhibition and public programming spaces.” The other day, Tribeca artist Grimanesa Amorós posted a still image and video (above) of “Argentum,” the installation she created for the Bronx Museum’s Tribeca outpost. You’ll recall that her “Terrarium” is in the lobby of 54 N. Moore.

••• And the big news here is that another significant gallery is coming onboard. James Cohan gallery has reportedly signed a lease at 48 Walker (below), currently Nili Lotan’s showroom/studio. Cohan currently has locations in Chelsea and the Lower East Side, and I’m not sure whether the Tribeca gallery will be a third or taking the place of one of those. (The gallery said it can’t confirm anything at this time.) Cohan received quite a bit of press last October when people objected to Omer Fast’s exhibit, August, which “constructed a caricature of a derelict Chinatown business that visitors walk through to see the artist’s video work in the backroom,” in the words of Hyperallergic.

I suspect this won’t be the last of it.

 

1 Comment

  1. Even though I can’t afford most (any) of the art in these places, I still love this development of the neighborhood. It’s a pleasure to explore the works of all these artists, even just to take it in through windows while walking down the street. I hope the galleries can survive and remain in the neighborhood (and that we don’t follow the Jane Jacobs prediction of eventual ossification into “dead” neighborhoods full of redundant bank branches and chain stores, like way the once gallery-ful East Village ).

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