Recent Comments

  • Placards for residents. Everybody can park except the people who live here. Our quality of life is deteriorated by an insane amount of factors downtown. — Placards for Residents on An Attempt at Placard Reform

  • Eric -- You ask, "Will NYPD ever really enforce placard reforms that necessarily include its own abuses?" The answer is, of course, No ... not until the public demands that the mayor act. While we can all admire CM Chin's and her council colleagues' brave words, Streetsblog has this reality check: "In testimony before the City Council transportation committee today [June12], NYPD Director of Legislative Affairs Oleg Chernyavsky batted away efforts by city council members to reform the system. Intro 942, proposed by Council Member Peter Koo, would task the Department of Transportation with coming up with a “comprehensive plan” for the distribution and use of city-issued placards. “The department believes in reforming the parking permit system,” Chernyavsky said. “However, we are concerned with this legislation as it leaves the determination of how many parking permits the NYPD requires to another agency.” He expressed further “concern” that such a plan would limit the number of permits the NYPD can issue. "Chernyavsky also opposed the three other placard-related bills on the agenda. "Intro. 927, which would create an electronic tracking system for city-issued placards, would pose a “security” risk by putting NYPD information in a database outside of the agency’s control. It would also entail “a significant amount of work,” he said. Intro. 932, which would revoke the placard of any driver caught misusing their placard three or more times in a year, should be “best left to the agency’s internal disciplinary process.” And Intro. 314, requiring NYPD to compile quarterly placard abuse reports “cannot currently be accomplished with our existing capabilities.” "In other words, leave everything up to NYPD, and don’t expect any transparency whatsoever. "Neither Chernyavsky nor NYPD Traffic Enforcement District Commanding Officer Deputy Chief Michael Pilecki offered insight into how the bills could be amended to support their purported goal of placard reform." The full Streetsblog post is here: https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2018/06/12/there-is-no-placard-crackdown-and-thats-how-nypd-wants-it/. But the headline in the link says it all. — Charles Komanoff on An Attempt at Placard Reform

  • Finally! It’s absolutely pathetic that we struggle with delivery’s on White street because there’s no room for a truck to unload for us. The entire neighborhood is plagued cars with these “parking permits”. There’s even to many legitimate ones...Why should all these entitled city workers get a Prius to clog our streets preventing our businesses to succeed? — Dave Richards on An Attempt at Placard Reform

  • Yeah, so tired of these Europeans ruining our land and history — Native American on Battle for the Heart of the Seaport

  • so tired of these developers ruining our city and history — Native on Battle for the Heart of the Seaport

  • No, likely not, especially if the experience at Grand and Lafayette Streets is instructive. The Village and SoHo Will Get New Parks at Long-Promised Sites, City Says By Danielle Tcholakian | October 7, 2016 5:08pm | Updated on October 9, 2016 2:08pm @danielleiat HUDSON SQUARE — In a new twist in the ongoing battle over the Elizabeth Street Garden, the city is now promising to make good on a decades-old promise to turn three city-controlled vacant lots in the Village and SoHo into public parks. The lots — one on Hudson Street between Clarkson and West Houston streets, another on Grand and Lafayette streets and the third on East Fourth Street and Bowery — were turned over to the Department of Environmental Preservation in the 1990s for work on shafts connected to the massive underground network of tunnels that supply the city's drinking water. As a condition of DEP's taking control of the sites, agreements were struck in writing that promised that when the agency finished the work on the shafts, the lots would be turned into public parks. But as DNAinfo New York reported late last year, DEP attempted to renege on those deals, and wanted to just leave the lots vacant and erect high fences around them. [...] Now the city is committing to allocate $3 million to help build three new parks on the DEP lots, $1 million per park, including a 11,250-square-foot one at Hudson and West Houston streets. [...] Because DEP will continue to need access to the underground infrastructure below the lots, the parks will be for passive recreation only, Grace said — meaning no ball fields or playground equipment. Grace said that in the event that DEP needs to access the shafts in an emergency, time would be of the essence, and DEP officials were concerned about needing to break through large or heavy structures such as playground equipment. Under the agreements signed in the 1990s, DEP had said they would only need 4,000 square feet of the parks to remain clear of any structures so they could access the shafts. https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20161007/hudson-square/elizabeth-street-garden-hudson-clarkson-west-houston-street/ — James on Basketball Court Could Be Closed for Years

  • Is there any chance they will renovate that basketball/park once work is complete? I've played basketball there a few times, and it really needs rehab. — Josh on Basketball Court Could Be Closed for Years

  • Any sense of the timeline on when the cladding will be completed on the East side of the building, and ultimately the sidewalk being completed on the west side of Church in front of 3WTC? My gut is telling me that is many months away. — J on Big Day at the World Trade Center

  • just so you don't think that i've totally lost it, here's an article with the history of the 18th century farmhouse on hudson street that i referenced. http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.com/2016/09/the-lost-1801-no-114-hudson-street.html — safe as milk on When Hollywood Built a Fake Diner in Tribeca

  • wow, thanks for finding those photos! clearly, i'm wrong. i think what i remembered as an 18th century farmhouse is the building with the barbershop at 246 west broadway. that building dates from 1910. i believe that the three story green thing that's on the lot now is newer. — safe as milk on When Hollywood Built a Fake Diner in Tribeca

  • What a beautiful photograph of loveyness, it makes you stop and think about how much Staple Street needs to be repaved. — Jim Smithers on Seen & Heard: Gitano Is Coming Along

  • Really? In the picture it looks like an abandoned shack. What was great about it? — IJM on Tribeca Then and Now: Washington Street and Environs

  • How exactly did I misrepresent the article? (I read it twice, actually.) — Erik Torkells on In the News: Runaway Dog Rescued from Hudson River

  • You misrepresented the Article you posted about the Four Seasons spa treatment. It’s as if you didn’t read the article at all and only inserted your own opinion. — Nytimes Article on In the News: Runaway Dog Rescued from Hudson River

  • They obviously missed the Queen because the nest came back the next day! — Janet W. Isa on The Latest Buzz

  • Thanks Jane for sharing and to Erik for putting this together - amazing. NYC is always evolving. I forget if you have shared this site or not, but NYPL digitized their old photos of NYC, some from 1900 and accessible at oldnyc.org - some of what we see now was around then, but much of what is old now was new then. — Demetri on Tribeca Then and Now: Washington Street and Environs

  • Onerous regulation is hurting lots of NYC businesses. At least here the rent cannot be blamed. — James on Nosy Neighbor: Where Has Danny the Ice Man Gone?

  • https://www1.nyc.gov/nycbusiness/description/mobile-food-vending-license/about . Read about all of the courses, certificates and fees required to apply for a Mobile Food Vending License. Perhaps it was not worth his continuing. — JPL on Nosy Neighbor: Where Has Danny the Ice Man Gone?

  • 1980s tax photo: http://nycma.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/detail/RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAN~2~2~493236~180233:dof_1_00190_0044 — James on When Hollywood Built a Fake Diner in Tribeca

  • I doubt there was an 18th century farmhouse there in the 1980s, especially since it was apparently not there in 1939. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47dd-5f1a-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99 — James on When Hollywood Built a Fake Diner in Tribeca

  • my memory is really fuzz about this but maybe someone else can confirm... the movie set was on a parking lot but the parking lot had not been there long. in the 1980s, there was a 18th century farmhouse on that lot. the house was torn down because the area was about to be land-marked. apparently, the owner was afraid that land-marking the structure would lower the value of the property so they tore it down. this sadly was not an uncommon practice. another 18th century house was razed on hudson street near bubby's for the same reason. — safe as milk on When Hollywood Built a Fake Diner in Tribeca

  • The music makes you eat and drink faster. I think volume varies based on neighborhood. Soho restaurant not that loud. — David on Joe & the Juice Is Opening Here

  • I stopped by earlier today. They say they will reopen as Zutto. Closure just temporary. We'll see. — Xacko on Zutto Has Closed

  • 456 Washington was a great building. Shame it got torn down. — verdang on Tribeca Then and Now: Washington Street and Environs

  • No, it is really not a "head shaker", even as ugly as this addition may be. If one is not inclined (or required by law) to set the addition back so as to make it invisible from a public thoroughfare, the *worst* thing one can do from a preservation point of view is to use identical, historical materials for the addition. That will only confuse the public by making it difficult to distinguish old from new and making it difficult to discern what portion of the historic building is truly historic. Would it have been better to make the addition more compatible and sympathetic? Yes. Would it have been better to make it matching? No. — james on Seen & Heard: Utilitarian Topper